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The Intersection of Science, Art, Music & Humanities

Welcoming Spring Again

Sunday, April 30, 2017


Today is the fifth Sunday in April, and in keeping with our commitment to spring and poetry every Sunday this month, we are featuring "Spring" from Vivaldi's Four Seasons for today's Sunday Morning Stop at the Intersection of Science, Art, Music and Humanities.


It's joyous, exuberant and, at times, as unpredictable as our high-altitude transition from winter to spring.

Each of the Four Seasons concertos are in the distinct form of fast-slow-fast movements. It's reported that "Spring" especially appealed to the French King Louis XV. It's said that he ordered it to be performed year round and at the most unexpected moments.


Antonio Vivaldi also wrote individual sonnets to go along with each movement of the Four Seasons. The music portrays the sonnets without losing overall quality and balance of the work.


We recommend listening to each movement of Vivaldi's "Spring" while reading his corresponding sonnet below.


It's a beautiful experience on the last day of April, the month set aside to recognize and appreciate poetry.  

Vivaldi's Spring Sonnet 


Allegro


Springtime is upon us.

The birds celebrate her return with festive song, and murmuring streams are softly caressed by the breezes.

Thunderstorms, those heralds of Spring, roar, casting their dark mantle over heaven,

Then they die away to silence, and the birds take up their charming songs once more.


Largo


On the flower-strewn meadow,
with leafy branches rustling overhead,
the goat-herd sleeps,
his faithful dog beside him.


Allegro


Led by the festive sound of rustic bagpipes,
nymphs and shepherds lightly dance beneath the brilliant canopy of spring.


Enjoy spring, hopefully it will return to Colorado soon.

Ellen Troyer, with Spencer Thornton, MD, David Amess and the Biosyntrx staff


Biosyntrx strongly believes that appreciation, exploration and commitment to science, art, music and humanities adds significantly to the global greater good and are important parts of the intellectual whole.