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The Intersection of Science, Art, Music & Humanities

Sunday Morning Deep Thoughts

Sunday, March 31, 2019


During these somewhat irrational times, it seems necessary to contemplate reason and faith. 


Therefore, today's Sunday Morning Stop at the Intersection of Science, Art, Music and Humanities will focus on Saint Thomas Aquinas, the Italian medieval priest, philosopher, and scholar who held a natural law theory of morality. What is good and evil, according to Aquinas, is derived from the rational nature of human beings.


Rational nature, or natural law is now defined as a philosophy asserting that certain rights are inherent by virtue of human nature, endowed by nature, traditionally by God or a transcendent source, and that these can be understood universally through human reasoning. 


According to a collective group of present day scholars, "Aquinas continues to matter, because he helps humans reconcile religion with science and faith with reason." 


"His monumental contribution was to teach Western European civilisation that any human being, not just a Christian, could have access to great truths whenever they made use of reason.  


"Aquinas is credited with breaking the logjam in Christian thinking: the question of how non-Christians could have both wisdom and, at the same time, no interest in—or even knowledge of—Jesus."


Thomas Aquinas not only shaped the Church, but influenced much of Western civilization. This may be a great year to consider purchasing the new edition of Mary T. Clark's five essays titled 

An Aquinas Reader


It provides the reader with written selections of one of history's most outstanding thinkers and reveals the major influence he had on many of the world's greatest philosophers.


Beware the person of one book.  ~Thomas Aquinas


Law is nothing other than a certain ordinance of reason for the common good, promulgated by the person who has the care of the community.  ~Thomas Aquinas


To one who has faith, no explanation is necessary. To one without faith, no explanation is possible.  ~Thomas Aquinas


Wishing our readers another thoughtful Sunday morning.


Ellen Troyer, with Spencer Thornton, MD, David Amess and the Biosyntrx staff